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The New York Times: "At home on both sides of the law and comfortable with moral murkiness."

Date: Feb 27 2013

Gene Kerrigan’s post-crash Dublin is a place where bankers and drug dealers are held in similar esteem. In this crime novel, his fourth, Vincent Naylor has been released from jail. For now. He begins putting together a crew, including his older brother, Noel, for a big robbery. When the well-told heist goes awry and a witness is endangered, Detective Bob Tidey devises a delicate, risky plan to make things right. A subplot involving a millionaire murdered in his home never seems essential, but Mr. Kerrigan breathlessly moves among his primary characters: Vincent, Tidey and a retired nun with a guilty conscience. It’s been five years since the final episode of HBO’s series “The Wire.” Fans can find many of the same strengths in Mr. Kerrigan’s work, which is also at home on both sides of the law and comfortable with moral murkiness. Even the book’s nun doesn’t believe in redemption, only in “owning up, living with the things we do.”