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The New York Times: "Good news for readers who can appreciate the moral complexities of this flawed hero. "

Date: May 4 2007

Maverick cops who write their own rules out of frustration with the criminal justice system are hardly unknown in detective fiction, but it’s rare to find one whose decline and fall is as tragic as that of Detective Inspector Harry Synnott, the Dublin police officer who loses his soul in Gene Kerrigan’s gripping procedural, The Midnight Choir.  

Synott is well aware that his old-fashioned values are out of sync with those of the new, entrepreneurial Ireland.  But while the Celtic Tiger may have joined the modern world, Synott can see that “we’re still committing the same old crimes,” and it eats him up when a rape case is compromised by his hard-nosed ethical code.   To Synott’s grief, his efforts to game the system on another case go seriously awry, endangering the life of a young informant.  “You’re not the first policeman to find himself tripping over an ambiguous moral line,” a superior officer observes.  While that’s hardly any comfort for Harry Synott, it’s good news for readers who can appreciate the moral complexities of this flawed hero.