Join us

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
Newsletter

Gail Jones

Sorry

Gail Jones

Sorry

2008, pp. 256, Paperback
ISBN: 9781933372556
Region: Australia
$ 14.95

The book

“Jones’s writing is fluid and memorable . . . the story proves powerful and poignant.”—The Guardian

Sorry is set in the remote outback of Western Australia during World War II, where an English anthropologist and his wife raise a lonely child, Perdita. Her upbringing is far from ordinary: in a shack in the wilderness, with a self-absorbed father burying himself in books and an unstable mother whose obsession with Shakespeare forms the backbone of the girl’s limited education.

Emotionally adrift, Perdita becomes friends with a deaf mute boy, Billy, and a forsaken Aboriginal girl, Mary. Perdita and Mary come to call one another sister and to share a profound bond. The three misfit children are content with each other and their life in this distant corner of the world, until a terrible event lays waste to their lives.

Through this compelling story of Perdita’s childhood, Gail Jones explores the values of friendship, loyalty and sacrifice with a brilliance that has earned her numerous accolades.

Advance Praise for Sorry “In deft and vivid prose . . . Jones’s gift for conjuring place and mood rarely falters.”—Times Literary Supplement

“Gail Jones’s stunning new novel… [is] written beautifully.”—The Independent

“Jones has a marvelous ear for language . . . a novelist who deserves to be celebrated.”—The Telegraph

“An elegantly written lament for lost opportunities.”—The Financial Times

The author

Gail Jones
Gail Jones is the author of two short-story collections, a critical monograph, and the novels Black Mirror, Sixty Lights, Dreams of Speaking and Sorry. Shortlisted three times for the Miles Franklin Award, her prizes include the WA Premier's Award for Fiction, the Nita B. Kibble Award, the Steele Rudd Award, the Age Book of the Year Award, the Adelaide Festival Award for Fiction and the ASAL Gold Medal. She has also been shortlisted for international awards, including the IMPAC and the Prix Femina. Her fiction has been translated into nine languages. Before coming to UWS Gail worked in the Department of English at the University of Western Australia. In 2001 she received the Australian Universities Teaching Award for Humanities and the Arts. Her academic interests are in narrative, cinema, cultural studies, contemporary literature and Australian literature.

Reviews

From the same country

  • Rohan Wilson

    To Name Those Lost

    2017, pp. 240, $ 17.00
    A powerful page-turner about a father and son in search of each other in a lawless age and a violent land, To Name Those Lost is a tale of guilt,...
  • Joan London

    The Golden Age

    2016, pp. 224, $ 17.00
    The Golden Age is an immensely satisfying and generous-hearted story about displacement, recovery, resilience, and love.
  • Charlotte Wood

    The Natural Way of Things

    2016, pp. 208, $ 17.00
    The Natural Way of Things is at once lucid and illusory, a brilliantly plotted novel of ideas that reminds us of mankind's own vast contradictions—the...
  • Tim Baker

    Fever City

    2016, pp. 400, $ 18.00
    1960s Los Angeles: a detective searches for the kidnapped child of one of America's richest men, while a notorious hit man's story unfolds in the...
  • Zane Lovitt

    The Midnight Promise

    2013, pp. 320, $ 16.00
    A superlative work of hardboiled detective fiction, The Midnight Promise introduces readers to an instant classic in the annals of noir antiheros:...
  • Peter Kocan

    The Treatment & The Cure

    2008, pp. 256, $ 14.95
    “A little masterpiece, not only in the history of prison literature, but in that of literature itself.”—The Bulletin (Sydney)