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Carlo Lucarelli

© Basso Cannarsa

Carlo Lucarelli

Carlo Lucarelli is one of Italy’s best-loved crime writers. He was born in Parma in 1960. His publishing debut came with the extremely successful De Luca Trilogy in 1990 and he has since published over a dozen novels and collections of stories. He is an active member of several Italian and international writer’s association, he teaches at Alessandro Baricco’s Holden School in Turin and in Padova’s maximum security prison. Several of his novels have been translated into French for Gallimard’s renowned “Noir” series. He conducts the program “Blue Night” on Italian network television, and his novels Almost Blue and Lupo Mannaro have both been made into films, the first by Alex Infascelli and the latter by Antonio Tibaldi.

Lucarelli's Web site (in Italian)

Author's profile on Wikipedia

All Carlo Lucarelli's books

Upcoming events

Personal Best - here's my 2006 Ten Best List... Carlo Lucarelli's Carte Blanche makes Bill Adler's Ten Best List...read more. LIBERATION MOVEMENTS, by Olen Steinhauer (St. Martin's Minotaur). Volume...

Latest reviews

  • If there's one writer who ratifies [Michael] Dibdin's dark, ironic but oddly nostalgic vision, it is Carlo Lucarelli. Lucarelli, a well-known TV personality in Italy, hosts a late-night show devoted to unsolved mysteries, whose subjects range from the mysterious death of...
    — Jul 1 2008
  • from Words Without Borders If more historical crime fiction were like Carlo Lucarelli's De Luca trilogy, I'd probably read more of it than I do now. What makes Lucarelli's brand different? For one thing, the De Luca books are compact and almost devoid of picturesque...
    — Jun 18 2008
  • With Via Delle Oche Carlo Lucarelli closes his trilogy set in postwar Italy where communists are violently pitched against conservative Christian Democrats, and everyone is hypersensitive to their partisan or fascist pasts. His hero, Commissario...
    — Jun 10 2008
  • Set in 1948, Lucarelli’s magnificent final volume in his De Luca trilogy (after The Damned Season and Carte Blanche) delivers a resolution true to the series’ moral relativism. Soon after joining the vice squad of the Bologna police department, Commissario De Luca...
    — May 10 2008
  • from Detectives Beyond Borders This is the second of Carlo Lucarelli's three novels about Commissario De Luca, a police officer by talent, inclination and temperament, if not always by title, in post-World War II Italy. The story is inextricably tied to its setting,...
    — Jun 26 2007
  • Carlo Lucarelli also mines recent historical fiction with the middle volume of a trilogy of post-World War II novels featuring Commissario Di Luca. Still haunted by Italy's war and the aftermath of Mussolini's fascist regime, he is on the run from those...
    — May 14 2007
  • from International Noir Carlo Lucarelli's 1940s-noir series featuring Detective De Luca began with Carte Blanche and now continues (in English) with The Damned Season. Where as the first novel (or novelette, since each of these books is barely over 100 pages) dealt with...
    — May 9 2007
  •         The Damned Season continues the story of De Luca, a policeman caught up in the turmoil that is Italy at the end of World War II. Last left at the end of Carte Blanche going on the run, The Damned Season begins with him washing up in a small Italian...
    — May 9 2007
  • The second in the De Luca Trilogy to appear in the U.S. is set in 1946 and finds the former Commisario De Luca dodging partisan reprisals for the role he played as a member of the secret police under Mussolini. When he’s recognized by a partisan in an isolated village between...
    — May 4 2007
  • In this very noir depiction of life in post-World War II Italy, there is detective Commissario De Luca and a crime-murder-but they just provide the occasion to talk about life at a time when the country's moral anchors had come loose and every Italian had a grudge. To avoid reprisals...
    — May 4 2007
  • Crusty Commissario De Luca gets drawn into a murder investigation in spite of himself.  Traveling incognito to Rome in 1946, Milan detective De Luca is accosted by enthusiastic Ravenna police chief Leonardi, ostensibly because he looks so out of place. Despite brand-new papers...
    — Apr 20 2007
  • Set in 1946, Lucarelli's taut middle volume of his De Luca trilogy (after Carte Blanche) finds Commissario De Luca, who was a police officer during the Mussolini regime, in a perilous position. Under an assumed name, De Luca is just trying to survive any way he can when a member...
    — Apr 1 2007
  • Set in 1946, Lucarelli's taut middle volume of his De Luca trilogy (after Carte Blanche) finds Commissario De Luca, who was a police officer during the Mussolini regime, in a perilous position. Under an assumed name, De Luca is just trying to survive any way he can when a...
    — Mar 21 2007
  • Personal Best - here's my 2006 Ten Best List... Carlo Lucarelli's Carte Blanche makes Bill Adler's Ten Best List... read more. LIBERATION MOVEMENTS, by Olen Steinhauer (St. Martin's Minotaur). Volume four in a shrewdly understated series which tells the post...
    — Jan 17 2007
  • Italian Renaissance Carte Blanche by Carlo Lucarelli, translated by Michael Reynolds (Europa Editions, £8.99) Italian crime writing is going through a particularly exciting period, with fascinating and innovative books appearing from Rome, Turin,...
    — Oct 16 2006
  • Within the crime genre, I find that there's something inherently interesting in stories about policemen or detectives working within nasty regimes. There's Philip Kerr 's excellent "Berlin Noir" trilogy starring P.I. Bernie Gunther, partially set in Nazi Germany. There's...
    — Sep 30 2006
  • With its byzantine politics and delectable cuisine, Italy produces crime con brio. Some Suspects Are Ruled Out The Italy of an earlier era is the setting for Carlo Lucarelli's nifty short thriller Carte Blanche (Europa; paperback, $14.95; translated...
    — Aug 24 2006
  • Character Study Disguised As Cop Story Set in the days before the collapse of Mussolini's Italy, Carlo Lucarelli's "Carte Blanche" has an all-too-human hero. Under the best of circumstances, investigating a murder can be a trying enterprise. But imagine what it would have been...
    — Aug 24 2006
  • New in paperback: Where would crime fiction be without World War II to provide an invaluable distorting lens that lets writers show how badly private people can behave in a world gone mad? That admirable British TV series "Foyle's War" was a fine example, as are the books of...
    — Jul 20 2006
  • from The Complete Review B+: lean, atmospheric police procedural Carte Blanche begins with an explosion, a bomb at a funeral procession. It's April, 1945 in Italy, and everyone is positioning themselves for what's going to happen next. The fascists for the most...
    — Jul 10 2006

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