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Alexander Maksik

© Martina Bacigalupo

Alexander Maksik

Alexander Maksik is the author of the novels You Deserve Nothing (Europa, 2011) and A Marker to Measure Drift (Knopf, 2013), which was a New York Times Book Review Notable Book, as well as a finalist for both the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing and Le Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger.

All Alexander Maksik's books

Upcoming events

"Rivetingly plotted and beautifully written."—The New York Times (Read) Writing on B&N Reviews, Susan Salter Reynolds described Alexander Maksik's You Deserve Nothing thus: "Reminiscent...
Alexander Maksik is visiting bookstores and festivals around the country this fall to discuss his new novel, SHELTER IN PLACE!

Latest reviews

  • SHELTER IN PLACE was named one of The Guardian's "Best Books of 2016!"
    — The Guardian, Nov 27 2016
  • "Delicately nuanced, this mini saga of an America that lays just behind the headlines is full of emotions, lacerating but true to life in that it is about a recognisable form of everyday life and digs up feelings we all have inevitably had at times."
    — Lovereading, Nov 2 2016
  • "Shelter in Place subverts the Manic Pixie Dream Girl by taking her to her extreme conclusion...This is a book about the women in Joe’s life– mothers and lovers, sisters and strangers– but it manages to be feminist, angry, and deeply moving."
    — Book Riot, Oct 31 2016
  • "Maksik describes the highs and lows of bipolar disorder with heartbreaking beauty and terror."
    — Angel City Review, Oct 25 2016
  • “Shelter in Place is an exceptional look at the vagaries of bi-polar disorder, as well as a powerful consideration of family (both blood and chosen), violence against women (and in response to that violence), and the overwhelming power of love..."
    — The Cedar Rapids Gazette, Oct 23 2016
  • "Brutal in its honest prose and harsh reality, Alexander Maksik’s Shelter in Place sticks to your ribs like steak and mashed potatoes. Mental illness, intertwined with growing up and growing old, proves more haunting than any ghost story."
    — Campus Circle, Oct 9 2016
  • "It's a story that's harrowing and heartfelt all at once...a captivating story that will stick with you well beyond the final pages."
    — Booktrib, Sep 13 2016
  • "Maksik’s voice is distinctive and vivid, giving us a portrait of a life that is honest, visceral, truly extraordinary."
    — Departures, Sep 12 2016
  • "Shelter in Place feels to me like an even more accomplished novel: a book to shake your sense of self, by a writer doing exactly as he pleases."
    — Electric Literature, Sep 12 2016
  • "Shelter in Place is as unquestionably brilliant as it is painful; a rare meditation on mania, depression, and the rage of youth that so often dissipates with the approach of middle age."
    — The Huffington Post, Sep 9 2016
  • "There’s something truly exhilarating about reading a novel that’s so audaciously original, so inventive and let’s be honest, so sort of weird that you want to put it in the hands of just about everyone you know." Read the full review in the San Francisco Chronicle.
    — San Francisco Chronicle, Sep 8 2016
  • "The intense and often mesmerizing prose will draw literary-fiction readers, even as the author conveys disturbing images of sex, violence, loneliness, and despair. Suggest Shelter in Place to those who admire Miriam Toews’ All My Puny Sorrows (2014)."
    — Booklist, Aug 18 2016
  • Print review in Vanity Fair, September 2016
    — Vanity Fair, Aug 10 2016
  • “Sometimes a novel’s first sentence is so memorable that it comes to stand for the story itself...Such is the startling opening line of Alexander Maksik’s third novel.”
    — Shelf Awareness, Aug 9 2016
  • "Maksik [delivers] a portrait of bipolar disorder…that is honest and devastating."
    — Publishers Weekly, Jul 26 2016
  • "Alexander Maksik’s riveting and disturbing novel Shelter in Place (Europa)...is a totally original exploration of mental illness, sexual politics, family and violence..."
    — The Guardian, Jul 10 2016
  • "On every page we’re reminded of the paradox of how mysterious, thorny, and delicate family relationships can be."
    — Kirkus Reviews, Jun 22 2016
  • "The novel I'm most excited about..."
    — The Nation, Jun 6 2016
  • Take the 1989 film Dead Poets Society and add the Police song “Don’t Stand So Close to Me”. Throw in a load of Lolita and The Stranger. Season with a dash of Sartre and the biblical book of Job. Mix thoroughly with almost equal parts of teen angst, youthful optimism and...
    — Aug 4 2014
  • Natalie Bakopoulos: First things first: How did you come to be a writer, and who were some of your greatest influences? Alexander Maksik: The simplest response is to say that I wanted to write more than I wanted to do anything else, which is the truth. But why that’s...
    — Jun 26 2014

United States