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Edwin M. Yoder, Jr.

Edwin M. Yoder, Jr.

Edwin M. Yoder, Jr. is the author of The Night of the Old South Ball and Joe Alsop’s Cold War. He has served as the editorial page editor at The Washingtonian Star, where he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1979, and as a columnist for The Washington Post Writers Group (1982-1997). He and his wife live in Washington, D.C.

All Edwin M. Yoder, Jr.'s books

Latest reviews

  • In 1888, Henry James despairingly hoped that "some day all my buried prose will kick off its various tombstones at once". He could not have imagined another type of literary revival: Henry James as a character, raised up from the grave by the imaginations of other authors. One...
    — Jan 18 2008
  • In the summer of 1908, Henry James receives a distinguished guest at Lamb House, his English residence in the seaside village of Rye. The visitor is Sigmund Freud, archly nicknamed the “Viennese sage” by James, and invited at the suggestion of the author’s psychologist...
    — Dec 4 2007
  • "What if" is historical fiction's juiciest question. In 1908, Henry James was working on his exhaustive New York Edition on the Sussex coast and Sigmund Freud was visiting England on business. Journalist and academic Yoder imagines a meeting that turns into a two-week analysis,...
    — Nov 12 2007
  • MASTER AND SHRINK Sigmund Freud puts Henry James on the couch. By Joseph Epstein Counterfactual history deals in questions of What If: What if the Athenians had brought more cavalry and proved victorious at Syracuse? What if Lenin hadn't arrived at the Finland Station?
    — Oct 15 2007
  • Yoder, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and author, takes a wonderfully readable look at what might have happened had fiction master Henry James and Sigmund Freud, a firm believer in the science of the mind, ever met. Horace Briscoe, James’s houseguest, witnesses their...
    — Sep 19 2007
  • From Henry James to Edith Wharton, regarding Sigmund Freud:  "The new and prodigious Joseph the Pharoah he [Freud] may be; but the lean and fat kine are anything but plain old cattle!  Be well assured, nonetheless, that I am eager to learn what prodigies of ennui the talking...
    — Sep 12 2007
  • It's hard not to be fascinated by Henry James and Edith Wharton; their dazzling conversations, letters and lives. Add Sigmund Freud to their charmed circle at James' Lamb House in Rye, Sussex, in the late English summer of 1908, and you have a novel reminiscent of Virginia Woolf's...
    — Sep 10 2007
  • A fictive meeting between Henry James and Sigmund Freud forms the center of former Washington Post columnist Yoder’s effervescent novel, which follows two short fiction and several nonfiction titles. In 1908, a concerned William James asks Freud to make a trip to Rye, England,...
    — Jul 17 2007
  • Sigmund Freud spars with Henry James in this light and amusing historical novel. Although there is no evidence that Freud ever met novelist James, the contemporary thinkers would have had much to discuss. In this fanciful imagining of such a meeting, Yoder (Telling Others...
    — Jun 26 2007

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